Biden’s student loan forgiveness plan is a slap in the face to veterans and active military

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

As President Biden considers forgiving student loan debt, there are important factors to consider, including the impact on our military and veterans who earned opportunities to pursue an affordable college education.

For most veterans, the choice to join the military was foremost about serving our country. But for many, it was also about receiving benefits to attend college without debt. Earning the GI Bill means giving up years of their lives, serving in dangerous jobs and situations. The student loan debate is leaving out the impact cancellation will have on the veteran and active-duty community.

That’s probably why, in a recent Mission Roll Call poll of 6,202 veterans, 77% opposed student loan forgiveness.

BIDEN’S STUDENT LOAN ‘FORGIVENESS’ PLAN IS A RAW DEAL FOR TAXPAYERS

College is expensive, and it’s only getting pricier. But since an undergraduate degree – even if unrelated to one’s subsequent career – has become a barrier to entry for most professional career tracks, now prospective students feel like they have no other option. They become saddled with student loans that don’t go away in bankruptcy and can delay important life events like buying a home or having children.

But there has always been a path to free higher education. For over 80 years, military service and the GI Bill have enabled millions of Americans to pursue college debt-free, or nearly free. Serve in the military, and the federal government will help ensure you have the resources necessary for success without burdensome debt.

For over 80 years, military service and the GI Bill have enabled millions of Americans to pursue college debt-free, or nearly free

Already in college? Join the ROTC. In the military and want to use the GI Bill for graduate school? Use tuition assistance. Not sure what you want to do out of high school? Enlist and earn your GI Bill. Already have a degree or want to make the military your career? Transfer the GI Bill to your kids.

GREGG JARRETT: BIDEN’S PLAN TO BRIBE MILLENNIALS BY CANCELING DEBT CAN’T AND WON’T WORK

I joined the Marine Corps two weeks out of high school, deployed to Afghanistan, and earned my degree using the GI Bill. I know firsthand the sacrifices service members made to earn that benefit. They all made a choice. In most cases, joining the military meant receiving the GI Bill and the chance to go to school for little to no cost. They earned that opportunity.

Cole Lyle serves as the Executive Director of the Mission Roll Call.  Prior to Mission Roll Call, Cole worked as an advisor to senior leadership at VA and has a veteran policy in the United States Senate.  Cole was honorably discharged as a Non-Commissioned Officer in the Marine Corps after serving six years, including a deployment to Afghanistan.

Cole Lyle serves as the Executive Director of the Mission Roll Call. Prior to Mission Roll Call, Cole worked as an advisor to senior leadership at VA and has a veteran policy in the United States Senate. Cole was honorably discharged as a Non-Commissioned Officer in the Marine Corps after serving six years, including a deployment to Afghanistan.
(Mission Roll Call)

The US military is an all-volunteer force; the active-duty component makes up less than 1% of the total civilian population. Every year, hundreds of thousands of Americans earn the GI Bill as an incentive for their service. It isn’t something freely given, and it isn’t something any civilian can feel entitled to.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

For veterans and active troops who want to pursue a debt-free education through honorable service, policies that forgive student loan debt minimize their efforts and experiences.

Canceling student debt is a nuanced and complex policy proposal, worthy of debate. And yet, like many broad policies, the veteran community could be affected by unintended consequences.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Joining the military is not the only way to attend college, but it’s a vital option for service members who want a degree without having to saddle themselves with tens of thousands of dollars in debt. It was certainly the right of those who chose not to serve to find different options, but it should not be at the literal and figurative expense of those who served our nation.

Serving in uniform takes commitment and courage. And as our nation’s leaders discuss student loan forgiveness, we hope they adequately consider the life-changing decisions service members make for our country and honor their service in this debate.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.